Trivet's 101

WHITE OAK LATTICE TRIVETS: FINISHED

I finally finished my last set of trivet’s and there different because of a couple of reasons.

  • Made from solid white oak

  • These trivet’s will be sold as a set of 3

  • There is 2 sizes in the set a big one at 14-1/2” and the smaller trivet is 7” sq.

I did make a set of plans that I will be making available in my shop soon and the plans detail how to make both sizes.

Trivet Dimension Details:

14-1/2” x 7” x 3/4” (Long Trivet)

7”x 7” x 3/4” (Short Trivet)

Tools Needed

  • Table-saw

  • 1/2” wide dado stack

  • A power sander , I used a random orbital sander

Finish Used

I used a 1:1 ratio of oil based polyurethane & mineral spirits, I applied 2 coats sanding between each coat with 320 grit sand paper and then finally burnished the trivet with 0000 steel wool.

Here is the completed trivet set.

Here is the completed trivet set.

Here is a top view of the larger trivet

Here is a top view of the larger trivet

Here is a top view of the smaller trivets

Here is a top view of the smaller trivets

Here is a view of the bottom of the trivet set

Here is a view of the bottom of the trivet set

Here is the bottom view of the larger trivet

Here is the bottom view of the larger trivet

Here is a view of the bottom faces of the smaller trivets, I actually like this side of the trivet, but I guess I like the top face more.

Here is a view of the bottom faces of the smaller trivets, I actually like this side of the trivet, but I guess I like the top face more.

I will be making the plans available soon and these trivet set’s will also be available in my Etsy store and my shop here, I hope to have all these items posted in the next few days.

Thanks for reading and see you next.


New Project: More Trivet's !!!!! Going bigger

LARGE TRIVET’S

I have to say that I am definitely love making trivet’s although they may not be a money maker that I hoped for but I will leave them in my shop just in case someone actually comes across them.

Anyway I am moving away from the router made trivet’s just for a change and will be making this trivet on my table-saw equipped with a dado stack. The trivet actually don’t take that long to make but they do take more time sanding and applying finish to them mainly because of the drying time involved. The larger trivet is more than twice the size of the last project I did.

Anyway this is the Process, need to apply finish but that is for another days work.

  • Purchase the lumber & Sticker it overnight

  • Ripped the wood to its final width

  • Crosscut the trivet blanks on my miter saw

  • Router Table Time

  • Design & Spacers

  • Dado stack time small trivet

  • Larger Trivet

  • Sanding & More Sanding

PURCHASE THE LUMBER & STICKER OVERNIGHT

I purchased the lumber at the same place I bought the red birch for the last trivet’s I made from at Barney & Carey Lumber located in Avon, MA. but this time I purchased white oak for my current project, I have used red oak in the past but I purchased it big box stores and let me tell you the quality difference between the two is huge.

For the lumber to dry properly, you’ll need to sticker your pile. Stickering refers to the use of narrow strips of wood – typically 1”x 1” – between the layers of lumber to allow adequate air flow. For best results, the stickers should all be the same length (the same as the width of the pile) and rot- and stainfree (to minimize staining your lumber). In a perfect world, the stickers would be dry, but billions of feet of wood have been stacked using green stickers created in the board edging process with perfectly adequate results.

I sticker-ed the wood here using some scrap wood to separate the two boards.

I sticker-ed the wood here using some scrap wood to separate the two boards.

RIPPED THE WOOD

So my first step was to rip the wood to its final width and I figured it better to do this before I cross-cut the wood into their respective trivet sizes, anyway its better to rip one board than 20 of varying sizes as you are removing or lowering the percentages of error.

I used my feather-board to make sure that the board didn’t move away from the rip fence, I also used a rip blade for this process.

I used my feather-board to make sure that the board didn’t move away from the rip fence, I also used a rip blade for this process.

CROSS-CUTTING TIME

Next step was to cut the trivet blanks and I used a set-up on my miter saw station where I used a stop block but because I was making two sized trivet’s I made 2 sized spacers, so placing the the stop block I measured the distance for the larger trivet and cut a spacer to that size, then measured the distance for the small trivet and created another spacer block to that dimension, below you can see some pictures of the process, this makes it very easy to repeat cuts and makes the operation go a lot smoother and removes the need to measure every single trivet that needs to be cut.

Here you can see the oak sitting on the miter saw deck and the spacer block is establishing the positive that I need to make all cuts the same size.

Here you can see the oak sitting on the miter saw deck and the spacer block is establishing the positive that I need to make all cuts the same size.

Here is a image of the stop block and its nothing more than a scrap piece of ply that I cut to make sure that all the large trivets are the same size, I also made another one for the smaller trivet. Not the metallic production stop this never moves and I can swap out the 2 spacer blocks dependent on what size trivet I am cutting. It worked like a charm.I also label each spacer block so I wouldn’’t get then confused.

Here is a image of the stop block and its nothing more than a scrap piece of ply that I cut to make sure that all the large trivets are the same size, I also made another one for the smaller trivet. Not the metallic production stop this never moves and I can swap out the 2 spacer blocks dependent on what size trivet I am cutting. It worked like a charm.I also label each spacer block so I wouldn’’t get then confused.

ROUTER TABLE TIME

The next phase of the build was to add a round-over to the trivet on all faces I figured this would be a lot easier to do while the the trivets were still blanks and did not have a ton of grooves and dadoes for the router bit to get stalled on. So using my router table with a 1/4” round-over bit in the router I made a couple of passes to remove all the sharp corners.

Here is the router table with the but installed.

Here is the router table with the but installed.

Here is a close-up of the round-over bit.

Here is a close-up of the round-over bit.

All 3 trivet blanks have the round-over now and really feel smooth to the touch.

All 3 trivet blanks have the round-over now and really feel smooth to the touch.

Here is a close-up shot of the round-over, looks and more importantly feels great.

Here is a close-up shot of the round-over, looks and more importantly feels great.

I meant to say that before I brought the pieces to the router table I wanted to make sure that I put the trivets in sequence as to how they were cut from the board that way I was maintaining the boards natural grain direction and making it look really nice. Below you can see what I mean, I also marked the best face for the top of the trivet.

Here is the boards with the grain direction flowing right through the board, I also marked this face as the top of the trivet.

Here is the boards with the grain direction flowing right through the board, I also marked this face as the top of the trivet.

DESIGN & SPACERS

I came up with the design on my 3D software Sketchup and I actually made it in the last batch of trivet’s I made and thought that this design would look really nice if it was a lot bigger, I made a quick and dirty set of plans to follow so as that I put the grooves in the right places.

To help me all the grooves and dadoes that made up the design of the trivet I needed to make some spacer strips so as that I could repeat easily on every trivet.

Here are the spacer strips that I would use to align the table-saws rip fence to the trivet, I also marked each spacer width on the board so as that I didn’t use the wrong one.I used 6 spacers in total with measurements of 3/4”, 2”, 3 1/4”,4-1/2”, 5-3/4'“ and 7”.

Here are the spacer strips that I would use to align the table-saws rip fence to the trivet, I also marked each spacer width on the board so as that I didn’t use the wrong one.I used 6 spacers in total with measurements of 3/4”, 2”, 3 1/4”,4-1/2”, 5-3/4'“ and 7”.


DADO STACK TIME

To make the trivets I decided that I would use my dado stack. The trivet is not that hard to make but it does require a decent amount of concentration as it is easily screwed up. The lattice design is eventually created by rotating the board and using the spacers in designated areas. I was working both faces of the trivet. I will try my best to give accurate step by step below.



STEP 1: SMALL TRIVET

Place a 1/2” wide dado stack into the table-saw and raise it 3/8”. Since I am working on the small trivet I start with the 2” spacer strip as seen below. Run the the trivet blank through the Dado Stack which I will be calling DS from now on.

image-7968.jpeg

Here is the 2’ wide spacer strip to position the fence 2” away from the cutting edge of the DS.

STEP 2:

Here you can see the trivet positioned to cut the 1/2” wide 3/8” deep groove, once one side is rotate the trivet 180° to catch the other side. Now you will need to rotate the trivet so as that you can position 2 more grooves running perpendicular to the grooves you already made

Here you can see the trivet positioned to cut the 1/2” wide 3/8” deep groove, once one side is rotate the trivet 180° to catch the other side.

Here you can see the trivet positioned to cut the 1/2” wide 3/8” deep groove, once one side is rotate the trivet 180° to catch the other side.

Now you will need to rotate the trivet so as that you can position 2 more grooves running perpendicular to the grooves you already made. After this is done you trivet should look like the picture below

After step 2 your trivet will look like this, you will have 9 squares measuring 2”x2” and they are all on the same face (this is the top)

After step 2 your trivet will look like this, you will have 9 squares measuring 2”x2” and they are all on the same face (this is the top)

Step 3

Next we move onto cutting the grooves on the bottom face of the trivet, this is what determines the lattice style, if you dont like my spacing you can always use your own imagination to come up with your own design, anyway

With the 1/2” dado stack raised 3/8” high we are basically going to run grooves on the bottom side splitting the squares on the top in half but from underneath the top face, confusing I know but the pictures will help.

So using the 3/4” spacer to determine the distance from the blade to the rip fence we will run the trivet through the blade, after you run the trivet through the first side rotate the work-piece 90° and do the other 3 sides

Here is the orientation of the trivet being run through the blade, the groove will be 3/4” from either edge and what this does is places a groove directly under the 2” x 2” squares on the top

Here is the orientation of the trivet being run through the blade, the groove will be 3/4” from either edge and what this does is places a groove directly under the 2” x 2” squares on the top

This is what the trivet should look like now, all the outside edges should have a slot cut in them.

This is what the trivet should look like now, all the outside edges should have a slot cut in them.

STEP 4

This is the final step in cutting the grooves on the small sized trivet.

Using the 3-1/4” sized spacer to set the distance from the fence to the blade, this will center the dado stack in the middle of the work-piece to place one more groove.

Here is the 3-1/4”spacer

Here is the 3-1/4”spacer

Here is the finished trivet, still need to sand it as there was a lot of tear out

Here is the finished trivet, still need to sand it as there was a lot of tear out

Other than sanding the trivet down the smaller of the 2 trivets are made, I need to do a lot of sanding as you can see there is a lot of tear out, I need to figure out a way to reduce the amount of tear out as this will take a lot of sanding to make nice to the touch.

NEXT : THE LARGER TRIVET

The larger trivet is 14-1/2” long x 7” wide and is also made using the same lattice pattern as the smaller trivet, my goal is to sell these as a set of 3.

STEP 1

Using the 2” wide spacer block to determine the distance of the blade from the fence I ran the board through the blade along its length to establish the 2” wide squares on the top face then a swung the board to its other side and repeated the cut, creating 2 grooves running the length of the board .

Here is a picture of the 2’ wide spacer to determine the distance from the blade to the rip fence, after the rip fence is clamped I remove the spacer block and run the board through.

Here is a picture of the 2’ wide spacer to determine the distance from the blade to the rip fence, after the rip fence is clamped I remove the spacer block and run the board through.

I forgot to take a picture of the work-piece with just the 2 long slots cut, just disregard the under side cuts, that will be covered later.

I forgot to take a picture of the work-piece with just the 2 long slots cut, just disregard the under side cuts, that will be covered later.

STEP 2

So using most of the spacer blocks I start cutting all the cross grooves on the bottom of the trivet creating the lattice effect for the trivet.

I started with the 3/4” spacer and got all for sides of the bottom of trivet, then moved onto the next spacer which is 3-1/4” wide and again completed 2 across the grain cuts at each of the ends, next spacer was 5-3/4” and again I cut 2 across the grain grooves on each end and finally I used the 7” spacer and this located the center of the trivet and you should have a trivet that looks like this below.

Your trivet should look like this all the grooves in this past step were on the bottom face of the work-piece.

Your trivet should look like this all the grooves in this past step were on the bottom face of the work-piece.

Here is the completed bottom face of the trivet, I did however make an error I used the 7” spacer on the bottom and I didn’t need to that spacer was only to be used on the top but it turned out OK and I left it, that is why the middle of the top face of the trivet has that longer rectangle instead of 2 squares

Here is the completed bottom face of the trivet, I did however make an error I used the 7” spacer on the bottom and I didn’t need to that spacer was only to be used on the top but it turned out OK and I left it, that is why the middle of the top face of the trivet has that longer rectangle instead of 2 squares

THE NEXT STEP

Now that all the grooves were cut on the bottom of the trivet I needed to make the grooves that set up the 2” squares. As I mentioned above I made an error when I was doing the final cut on the bottom of the trivet I used he 7” spacer and I should not have because that spacer was for the top side, so as it turned out that I have bigger squares in the middle of the trivet and not 2 the same size as the rest. I determined that it actually didn’t look that bad and left it as a design element.

So lets move on

I started milling the top of the trivet and I started with the 2” wide spacer and cut the grooves on each end of the board, then move onto the 4-1/2” spacer and cut 2 grooves on each end of the board and that is it. If i had followed my plans I would have used the 7” spacer next but since I already used that on the bottom I could not use it on the top as it would have divided the trivet into two halves and I didn’t want that .

In this picture you can see the grooves left by using the 2’’ wide spacer when you turn it end fro end you get both grooves without re-measuring and that is said for all spacers except for the 7” spacer which was used to locate the middle groove of the work-piece.

In this picture you can see the grooves left by using the 2’’ wide spacer when you turn it end fro end you get both grooves without re-measuring and that is said for all spacers except for the 7” spacer which was used to locate the middle groove of the work-piece.

Here is the plan of what the trivet should have looked like but instead we have whats below, I don’t think it looks bad at all, sometimes mistakes look good.

Here is the plan of what the trivet should have looked like but instead we have whats below, I don’t think it looks bad at all, sometimes mistakes look good.

Here is the finished large trivet.

Here is the finished large trivet.

SANDING

So after all the table-saw work was finished I needed to do a lot of clean up work on the trivet’s as there was so much tear out , if your not familiar about tear out this happens when you are cutting wood with machines or by hand and what happens is that unsupported wood fibers blow out, I found an interesting article in Popular Woodworking that describes tear-out.

I need to do some more research and try and come up with a solution that will prevent large-scale tear out. Below are some pictures of the tear out that I had on my trivet’s.

Here is all the tear out I had on the underside of the trivet. All of the broken wood fibers is what tear-out looks like.

Here is all the tear out I had on the underside of the trivet. All of the broken wood fibers is what tear-out looks like.

Here is a closer look at the tear out on the bottom face.

Here is a closer look at the tear out on the bottom face.

Here is the tear out I had on the top of the trivet

Here is the tear out I had on the top of the trivet

SANDING & AIDS

This tear out will be easily removed in some locations and other areas will require a little more work. I found the tear out really bad on the underside of the trivet especially in slots that were cut, so to remedy the problem of sanding in tight quarters I made some home made sanding blocks, these are nothing more than scrap wood, but the wood had to less than 1/2” thick as that is the width of the grooves we cut, then I used various grits of sanding paper to smooth out the edges.

The top and bottom faces of the trivets were easily sanded as they were flat and I didn’t have to contend with the grooves, I used my orbital sander moving from 120 grit all the way up-to 400 grit and its very smooth now.

Here are my aids, 3/8” thick scrap piece of wood that I used to wrap the sandpaper onto and moves in and around all the grooves with ease.

Here are my aids, 3/8” thick scrap piece of wood that I used to wrap the sandpaper onto and moves in and around all the grooves with ease.

Here is what the trivet looks like now after a decent amount of time spend sanding them, is it done ?? I ask myself and I say no because all the over lapping milling marks left behind by the dado blade are not totally gone so I will need to return and do more, but as you can see the difference in the before and after is a big difference.

Before sanding

Before sanding

Before Sanding

Before Sanding

After sanding, this is the bottom side of the large trivet

After sanding, this is the bottom side of the large trivet

After sanding on the top face of the trivet.

After sanding on the top face of the trivet.

So after all the sanding done today there is a huge difference but before I go into production mode I need to figure out some solutions to some of the problems I encountered making this set.

  • Need to solve the tear out :- I might try cutting reducing the depth of cut and not taking out all 3/8” at one time, also considering alternating the with the grain and against the grain cutting, if I do all the against the grain cutting first hopefully cutting with the grain will also reduce the tear out.

  • Making sure I font repeat the mistake that resulted in a groove being placed in the wrong place, this cut have been a costly mistake but I was lucky that it didn’t ruin the trivet, this one is easy slow down and follow the plans .

Below are the 3 trivets that I made using this design and I have to say that they look great and especially like the white oak that I used but to be honest I like the red birch better, but the red birch had a lot of wood burn where as I didn’t get that with the oak.

Here is the finished set, there is almost 30” of space to hold hot plates and casserole dished or even a Thanksgiving turkey

Here is the finished set, there is almost 30” of space to hold hot plates and casserole dished or even a Thanksgiving turkey

You can arrange them any number of ways this is just another example.

You can arrange them any number of ways this is just another example.

NEXT:-

I need to apply the finish to them but to be honest this is a rinse and repeat from the last batch of trivets that I made using 3 coats of 1:1 ratio of oil based polyurethane and mineral spirits and after that has dried I will burnish them with very fine steel wool.

Trivet's Now On Sale!!!!!! But Limited Stock

Hello everyone,

I know that its been little while but better late than never, I am excited to announce that for the first time since I launched this site I am able to bring you my very first physical product line that everyone can use at home, as a gift, or just as a decorative table ornament that can be used with all the special holidays that are coming up.

I also want to inform that I am still keeping the site with Squarespace but I have partnered with Shopify to facilitate all my fulfillment services, so don't worry when you purchase a physical item on my site and are transferred to another site for Checkout. Right now all my digital plans will still be handled right here.

Waffle Style Trivet
15.00

Wood Trivet with a waffle design to match your kitchen/dining décor.

My Trivet will accommodate a variety of large or small serving dishes and create a decorative touch to your table. I gave a round-over profile making it very inviting to the touch and introducing a little subtle design element change. This trivet doesnt have inset grooves like the other waffle patterns I make instead these grooves run the entire surface of the top and bottom, creating a channel look on all outside edges of the item.

• Dimensions of trivet (Approx.: 7/8" x 6" x 6"

• Solid American Red Birch -

• Handcrafted in the USA



I use the USPS for all my shipping need's.

I do not currently ship outside the United States

When cleaning is needed, wipe with a wet cloth, avoid soaking in water and do not put it in the dishwasher.

Makes a perfect handcrafted gift for many occasions!

Project Award : Trivet Jig

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I recently received another Daily Top 3 Award on my online workshop where I currently have a membership with www.lumberjocks.com

I received the award along with 2 other makers that also made woodworking projects. My award was for the Trivet Router Jig that I made for the shop. I have included links below for the project.

 
Click for details: The Rockler Trivet Router Jig
Here is the trivet jig that I made.

Here is the trivet jig that I made.


Wooden Router Trivet Jig

WHY BUILD A TRIVET JIG??

So as of late I have been playing around with the idea of selling and shipping products on my site, but in the past I was really hesitant because of the costs associated with shipping and trying to determine how much to charge for said projects.

That was until I came across a show on YouTube about making and batching out certain projects for sale with minimal cost and time constraints. So that is how I came up with making Trivets because of a couple of reasons.

  • Small (Low shipping weight)

  • Can be made with a variety of woods

  • Can batch 10 or so in a day (without applying finish)

  • I already had an Etsy shop to sell from

Trivet Jig Design

I would love to take credit for this jig but unfortunately it wasn’t me, I came across this jig online at www.rocker.com , the jig’s concept is really easy to comprehend. It’s basically a trammel on a base, the base has 2 fences that hold the trivet blank and you adjust where the slots are cut with spacer blocks. Ill explain in more detail in a later part in this blog.

Here is the completed jig, its basically a base that has 2 fences that form a 90° corner where the trivet gets positioned, and held in place with the fences.

Here is the completed jig, its basically a base that has 2 fences that form a 90° corner where the trivet gets positioned, and held in place with the fences.

Here is a picture of the jig with the trivet blank positioned between the fences, I also used self adhesive sand paper to help keep the blank positioned while using the router.

Here is a picture of the jig with the trivet blank positioned between the fences, I also used self adhesive sand paper to help keep the blank positioned while using the router.

Here is the jig in use, you can see the router attached to the pivoting arm which is how I achieve the curved grooves in the trivet.

Here is the jig in use, you can see the router attached to the pivoting arm which is how I achieve the curved grooves in the trivet.

Although this is a plywood prototype of one of the designs I will be using, I am very happy with this design.

Although this is a plywood prototype of one of the designs I will be using, I am very happy with this design.

STEP BY STEP BUILD

Source Rockler.com


The trammel jig is fairly easy to assemble and, while it doesn't alter router's cutting radius, it allows you to make repetitive cutting patterns very simply. The jig is really simple to build. Start with a 22"-square scrap of 3/4" plywood or MDF, and draw a diagonal line connecting two corners. Cut a 6"-square trammel support from 1/2" scrap and bisect it with a pencil line. Fasten it to the base with glue and brads so the outermost corners of the support align with the edges of the base and the pencil marks of the two jig parts line up. Now rip a pair of 1/2" by 2" fences, cut them to an overall length of 15-5⁄8" and miter-cut one end of each to 45°.

Completed trammel jig (stock photo)

Completed trammel jig (stock photo)

JIG BUILD

Once you've put the mitered ends of the jig fence together against the support block, nail them down to secure them to the base. Butt the fences against the support piece so the tips of the miters touch. Make sure they form a square “pocket” for the trivet blanks to register against before nailing the fences to the jig base. Line the “field” area inside the fences with sandpaper attached with spray adhesive. Later, this will hold the trivets stationary as you rout them. I left the base’s outer corner bare where the trivets and spacers don’t reach it.

After mitering the corners of the fences to 45°, pin them in position and making sure everything lines up using a square. (stock photo)

After mitering the corners of the fences to 45°, pin them in position and making sure everything lines up using a square. (stock photo)

ADDING THE TRAMMEL

Draw a layout line 12" from the center-line of your bit to establish the pivot point of the trammel. The trammel is a scrap of 1/2" material cut 6" wide and 20" long; this width fit my router base nicely. If your router has a wider base, change the trammel width to suit it. Set the router near the trammel’s end to mark mounting holes for screws, as well as to establish where to bore a clearance hole for the router bit. Mark the trammel carefully with two layout lines: one identifying the center-point of the router bit and a second drawn 12" back from this line, before making the bit clearance hole and fastening the router to it. 

Attaching the trammel to the router (stock photo)

Attaching the trammel to the router (stock photo)

NEXT

Slide the trammel along the support block until the router bit touches the outer corner of a trivet blank to set the position of the jig. You’ll need one of your 6"-square trivet blanks to mount the trammel properly on the jig. With the router bit installed, set the trivet blank in the corner formed by the fences and balance the trammel on it and the square support block. Slide the trammel along the support until the inside edge of the bit just kisses the outer corner of the trivet

Positioning the router in order to find the pivot point on the jig (stock photo)

Positioning the router in order to find the pivot point on the jig (stock photo)

ATTACHING THE PIVOT PIN

Use the dowel's pivot point line to find where you can bore a dowel hole to complete the trammel. Make sure it lines up evenly over the support before boring a 5/16" dowel hole through the trammel and support — right into the base. Center this hole on your 12" layout line drawn previously. Now insert a 2" length of 5/16" dowel to engage the trammel’s pivot action. You’re nearly ready to start routing trivets, but first, make up 14 spacer strips from 1/2" scrap. Mine were 3/4" x 14".

Drilling the location of the pivot pin (stock photo)

Drilling the location of the pivot pin (stock photo)

MAKE SOME TRIVETS

Making your first cuts on the trivet face using a pair of spacers along the jig fences and cutting a little deeper than halfway through the blank in the first slot. Start the router and make your first cut, milling to final depth in two passes. I used a 1/2” up-spiral router bit — but any sharp straight bit should do fine. Swing the router clockwise or counterclockwise — either works fine, but keep the trammel pressed down firmly against the trivet blank to prevent it from shifting.

Begin routing the design (stock photo)

Begin routing the design (stock photo)

Continue adding and subtracting spacers and feeding your router clockwise and counterclockwise to make further cuts, but keep the trivet stationary as you pivot the router. Once you complete the first cut, pull the trivet forward, insert another pair of spacers and repeat for the second, longer “swoop.” Continue adding spacer pairs between subsequent cuts until you reach the other corner of the blank. Now flip the blank over, give it a quarter turn to establish the “X” pattern and repeat the whole routing process. This time remove one pair of spacers after each pass.

Adding spacer strips to maintain equal gaps between the grooves. (stock photo)

Adding spacer strips to maintain equal gaps between the grooves. (stock photo)

FLIP THE TRIVET

Flip the trivet and give it a quarter turn to make an "X" cutting pattern on the second face, continuing to cut them in the reverse of how you made the first side. In minutes, you’ll have your first trivet knocked out and be on to the second. Sand away any bit burn marks or fuzz, and round over the edges

The waffle pattern is coming to life. (stock photo)

The waffle pattern is coming to life. (stock photo)

THE above step by step guide is taken from the Rockler.com article as well as all the pictures, but below is a trivet that I made and looks OK, it will look even better when I actually get to use some really nice wood and not the plywood prototype that I used below.

Not too big and not too small, this prototype will look great in oak or ash.

Not too big and not too small, this prototype will look great in oak or ash.

Adding a round-over to both sides of the trivet really feel great to the touch and doesnt look too bad either.

Adding a round-over to both sides of the trivet really feel great to the touch and doesnt look too bad either.

Love the dimensional aspects of this little project.

Love the dimensional aspects of this little project.

I still need to do some research on making these and eventually with a bit of luck will be able to sell them in my Etsy store… I will also be making FREE PLANS for the jig once its completed I will posit it in my shop, don’t worry I will post when their available.

Thanks for reading, and I will catch you all again soon.

New Project: Trivets

So I needed a little project to keep me busy and I needed to use up some scrap wood that I had lying around. I was sitting at dinner one night and noticed that all the trivets looked terrible and some were even broken, so I went on YouTube and finally found an easy way to make them using a table-saw and dado stack.

THE PROCESS

  • The Wood

  • Miter Saw

  • The Trivet blanks

  • A little Layout

  • Cutting the Grooves

  • Adding a Round-Over on the Router Table

  • A lot of sanding

  • All finished

THE WOOD

Since I wanted to use up some scrap that I had around I used a piece of 1x8 poplar that I could get about 9 trivets out of. I wish I had some 1x8 oak as that would of been a nicer trivet, but maybe in the near future I will make some trivets for Christmas presents.

Here is the piece of poplar that I used.

Here is the piece of poplar that I used.

THE MITER SAW

Usually I use the miter saw a lot for a project but I only wanted to cross-cut the board to around 18” as I wanted to do a trial run making 3 trivets and see how they turned out.

Crosscutting the board at my miter saw station.

Crosscutting the board at my miter saw station.

TRIVET BLANKS

  • So after cutting the piece I took it from the miter saw to the table-saw and ripped the board to its final width.

  • I took out my cross-cutting sled because I usually get more accurate cuts from it and set-up a stop block and cross-cut the board into 3 blanks that were exactly 6”x6” square

Here is my cross-cutting sled is not fancy but it’s dead on accurate. You can also see the stop-block which is nothing more than a scrap of plywood clamped with the sled fence.

Here is my cross-cutting sled is not fancy but it’s dead on accurate. You can also see the stop-block which is nothing more than a scrap of plywood clamped with the sled fence.

Here is the 3 blanks all dimension-ed and ready to be turned into trivets.

Here is the 3 blanks all dimension-ed and ready to be turned into trivets.

A LITTLE LAYOUT

I needed to do a little layout on one of the trivets to make sure all my dimensions were correct, so I took it to my bench and drew some layout lines where I was removing wood.

  • Measure over 3” to find the center of the blank and strike a line, then measure 3/16” to the left & right of that line so as to center the 3/8” dado stack to the work-piece.

  • Finally measure 3/8” on the wood thickness (as it is half of 3/4”wood thickness) so as that I new where to position the dado stack in the table-saw

  • Now that I had marked up one face I needed to turn the board 90° and do the same on that side that is what creates the waffle pattern I am going for.

Here are my layout lines on one of the edges. All the “x” represent where the grooves will be run.

Here are my layout lines on one of the edges. All the “x” represent where the grooves will be run.

Here you can see the dado stack measuring up-to the 3/8” line on the blank edge.

Here you can see the dado stack measuring up-to the 3/8” line on the blank edge.

CUTTING THE GROOVES

Here is where it will get tricky in how to explain this process. Using a 3/8” thick dado stack in the table-saw I needed to cut the 7 grooves on each of the marked faces which will give me the waffle pattern design that I want. This is my first time making trivets lets alone doing repetitive groove cuts in such a small pirce of wood, but I am happy with the results, practice makes perfect. One more thing I experience a lot of tear-out doing this and it left a decent amount of sanding after.

Here is my attempt at detailing the step by step process.

STEP 1. With my 3/8’ wide dado stack center on the work-piece I run it through the blade, which results in a centered groove. As you see in the following pictures some of the cuts are made with the grain and others against it which is what makes the waffle pattern.

Using my center-line I ran the stock through the 3/8” wide dado stack

Using my center-line I ran the stock through the 3/8” wide dado stack

Here is the center groove

Here is the center groove

STEP 2: The goal of the next couple of steps is make grooves on one side of the blank with equal spaces between each groove.

  • Using the groove that I just made in the center, I re position that groove on the blade and use a spacer block which is 3/4” and position it beside the cut groove and line my table-saw fence against the spacer block and then move the work-piece over until it reached the rip fence. This step can gut 2 groves either side of the center by simply turning the workpiece 90° after each cut.


Here is the spacer block against the fence, when I remove the spacer block and move the work-piece against the fence it will center the next 2 grooves.

Here is the spacer block against the fence, when I remove the spacer block and move the work-piece against the fence it will center the next 2 grooves.

Here you can see the work-piece butted up to the fence and ran through the blade, once this is done I rotate the piece 90° to get the other groove.

Here you can see the work-piece butted up to the fence and ran through the blade, once this is done I rotate the piece 90° to get the other groove.

This is what you should have, 3 grooves equally spaced.

This is what you should have, 3 grooves equally spaced.

REPEAT STEP 2 UNTIL YOU GET ALL 7 GROOVES DONE ON ONE SIDE OF THE WORK-PIECE.

After repeating step 2, two more times you should have this. 7 grooves all running in the same direction, and for the most part equally spaced.

After repeating step 2, two more times you should have this. 7 grooves all running in the same direction, and for the most part equally spaced.

Here is a edge view of what your work-piece should look like.

Here is a edge view of what your work-piece should look like.

STEP 3: Now we turn our attention to the other side of the work-piece and create 7 grooves that go in from the other side than the ones we just did, this will reveal the waffle pattern.

  • Using the center line on this side, run it through the blade which is still at 3/8” wide & 3/8” high, you might need to make a couple of passes until you remove enough material to reveal one groove where you can see the waffle pattern below. After this step you should have what looks like below

Waffle pattern coming to life after cutting the center groove.

Waffle pattern coming to life after cutting the center groove.

As we did in Step 2 above we need to repeat that process to define all remaining 6 grooves using the spacer block and the rip fence method I used in Step 2. You should now have a work-piece with the waffle pattern visible, although in rough shape because of all the tear-out.

With 3 grooves cut, your piece should look like this, only 4 more cuts to make.

With 3 grooves cut, your piece should look like this, only 4 more cuts to make.

Here is the final waffle pattern, there was so much tear-out that I thought that I was doing something wrong or my dado stack wasn’t sharp. Anyway we clean this up later.

Here is the final waffle pattern, there was so much tear-out that I thought that I was doing something wrong or my dado stack wasn’t sharp. Anyway we clean this up later.

ROUND-OVER AT THE ROUTER TABLE

To remove all the sharp edges on the outside edges of the trivet I used a 1/4” round-over bit in my router at the router table and eased some of the edges.

1/4” round-over profile bit in the router table.

1/4” round-over profile bit in the router table.

I’m not sure if you can see the round-over profile as it is very small, but it did the trick. I will also be using several grits of sand paper to clean it up more, especially on the inner grooves that the router table cant reach.

I’m not sure if you can see the round-over profile as it is very small, but it did the trick. I will also be using several grits of sand paper to clean it up more, especially on the inner grooves that the router table cant reach.

A LOT OF SANDING

To be honest the most time consuming part of this project is all the sanding that needed to be done, there was so much tear-out on the inner grooves because the wood was un-supported going through the dado stack that it created a mess, so I used a piece of sand paper and wrapped it around a 1/4” thick piece of plywood to fit inside the grooves, I also used a chisel to remove some of the stubborn wood fibers.

After using the sandpaper I turned to my random orbital sander to sand the top / bottom sides of the trivet to make it inviting to the touch.

Here is what I started with when beginning to use the sandpaper.

Here is what I started with when beginning to use the sandpaper.

Here is my solution to sanding in between the grooves. Some various grits of sand paper finishing with 320 grit and a piece of 1/4” plywood scrap. I wrapped the paper around the plywood and went to town.

Here is my solution to sanding in between the grooves. Some various grits of sand paper finishing with 320 grit and a piece of 1/4” plywood scrap. I wrapped the paper around the plywood and went to town.

Here is the sandpaper doing the trick

Here is the sandpaper doing the trick

Here is the finished trivet, a great improvement over what I had started with.

Here is the finished trivet, a great improvement over what I had started with.

ALL FINISHED , FOR NOW!!!

Well I set out to make 3 and that is what I got done today, I gave the 3 to my mother in law and she was happy. These make a great little present, and the holiday season is coming up. I must say this was a fun little project and the possibilities are endless with the style options. I am actually thinking of making a jig that I can use with my router to do curved grooves, below is a few pictures of the threesome that I made.

Awesome project and a nice little item at the end.

Awesome project and a nice little item at the end.

Whats useful is that you can group them together if you have a large item that your table-top needs protection from.

Whats useful is that you can group them together if you have a large item that your table-top needs protection from.

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Well thanks for reading and I hope to catch you again soon. I am in the process of making plans for these exact trivets and I will post them in my store as soon as they are completed.